Pirelli Introduces the “66” Promotion on Select Motorcycle Tires

March 31, 2017 Press Release 0

Who doesn’t like rebates?

Begin Press Release:


Pirelli Introduces the “66” Promotion on Select Motorcycle Tires

Receive a $66 Prepaid Card on Street Tires, Including $40 on Road Racing Tires

Today, Pirelli unveiled a special, limited-time promotion that offers motorcyclists the chance to save big when purchasing a set of street or road racing tires from participating dealers across the nation. Riders can score a $66 prepaid card when purchasing a set (a front and a rear) of NIGHT DRAGON or MT 66 ROUTE tires, which are designed for custom motorcyclists seeking the ultimate in performance, comfort and mileage.

“The launch of Pirelli’s ‘66’ Promotion is not only a way to give back to those who have expressed brand loyalty throughout the years, but to encourage others to experience how truly great these products are,” said Scott Griffin, Pirelli VP of Sales, USA. “We’re offering great deals and savings to a wide variety of motorcyclists, whether it be a custom builder looking at the stylish performance of the NIGHT DRAGON or an avid sport bike and canyon carving rider who wants to enjoy the thrill of the latest in tire technology with the DIABLO ROSSO III.”

Pirelli will also be offering a promotion on select road racing tires, such as the industry-leading DIABLO SUPERCORSA and SUPERBIKE that feature technology developed directly within the World Superbike Championship. Riders looking to reach the next level in the sport segment will have the opportunity to earn a $40 prepaid card.

How It Works

  • Purchase a set of Pirelli tires from a participating dealer
  • Go to pirelli.com/usmotopromo and select “Redeem Your Rebate”. Then either:
    – Follow the directions to enter in your name, email address, mailing address, purchase details and upload your sales invoice online or
    – Download (or receive a printed form from your dealer) and complete the mail-in form, including a copy of your invoice and mail to the address indicated on the form.
  • Receive prepaid rebate card by mail

Offer valid on purchases beginning April 1, 2017, only for legal residents of the 50 United States and individual consumers of the District of Columbia. Rebates must be submitted by May 31, 2017.

To learn more about the complete line of Pirelli motorcycle tires and to find a dealer near you, please Click Here.

pirelli-66-promo-graphic-1 rr_40rebate

Pirelli Introduces the “66” Promotion on Select Motorcycle Tires appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

MO Tested: Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review

March 31, 2017 Evans Brasfield 0

Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review

Touring suits have a difficult job description. Quite simply, they need to protect the rider from both the elements and potential mishaps in a wide variety of weather and riding conditions. If you think that’s a prescription for compromise, you’d be right. However, compromise is not necessarily a bad thing. The essence of a successful compromise is how carefully the sacrifices are made. In the case of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit,  the designers made smart choices in crafting this modular riding garment.

The most obvious choice made by Spidi was to divide the differing kinds of protection required from the 4Season Suit into different layers. The exterior layer features abrasion protection the CE-certified armor in the elbows, shoulders, knees, and hips. (Oddly, the back protector is a $110 accessory item that was out of stock, but thanks to the interchangeability of Spidi’s armor, I was able to borrow Tom Roderick’s from his Spidi Ventamax H2Out Jacket.) The next layer is the waterproof layer, followed by the innermost insulating layer.

MO Tested: Spidi Ventamax H2Out Jacket & Thunder H2Out Pants

Layered Functionality

First, let’s consider the handsome exterior of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit. My wife has seen over 20 years-worth of riding gear pass through our house, and I can count on one hand the number of suits that she’s actually made me stop and model for her. After I was done prancing around the kitchen for her, she said the 4Season was the best looking touring suit she’d ever seen me wear. High praise from a very opinionated woman. However, the exterior construction is more than just a pretty face.

Spidi 4season h2out suit gauntlet zipper vent

The sleeve alone shows the versatility of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit. The adjusters allow the rider to fine-tune the sleeve’s fit. The reversible gauntlet zipper opens a vent on the inner arm for cooling airflow.

The exterior of the suit is constructed of what Spidi calls tenax Nylon 6.6 of varying densities, with lower potential for abrasion sections receiving the lighter, more supple textile. Higher impact areas, like the elbows, shoulders, knees, and seat receive a heavier version of the fabric, sometimes in multiple layers. To account for differing body types and for the fact that removing the two inner jacket layers can slightly affect its fit, adjustments are used throughout. The rider’s torso gets a high and low adjustment belts on both the left and right side to allow for broad-chested (or broad-bellied) riders. The arms each receive a strap on the upper and lower arm to minimize wind flap or give a little extra room for airflow on hot days. The bottom edge of the jacket also utilizes an adjustable elastic cord to help keep cold wind and rain out – a very good thing when one considers that the jacket and pants do not zip together.

Thanks to the layers, the vents on the jacket and pants do not need to be waterproof. This is a place that many suits run afoul of either leaks or poor venting. The two chest vents unzip and roll down to create a 5-inch x 5.5-inch opening. The rear vent measures 8 x 9 inches while the pants’ thigh vents form an 11-inch long triangle that is 3 inches wide at its base. All of the vent covers snap out of the way in their open configuration.

Spidi 4season h2out suit vent flaps

The vent flap tucks cleanly out of the way and is secured with snaps to hold it open. The tightly sealing zippers (left) keep cold air from leaking into the jacket in cooler weather.

The waterproof layer of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit is completely removable, giving the rider direct access to the airflow from the vents in dry weather. When the H2Out inner layer is installed the suit becomes completely wind/water-proof. This design has two drawbacks that the rider must accept. First, none of the pockets in the exterior shell are waterproof. So, don’t keep your wallet or cell phone in them during a downpour. Second, donning the waterproof layer requires that the suit be removed. Personally, if it means I’ll be dry and warm, I’m willing to stand on the side of the road in my boxers for a minute or two. Your level of modesty may dictate otherwise.

The second issue with inserting the inner layer is the numerous attachment points between the exterior and interior layers. Personally, I always took the time to snap the 7 jacket loops and the 13 snaps (plus 6 loops) on the pants because they kept the liner properly positioned. Your mileage may vary. Once in place, the suit defended my meaty core from the sometimes heavy rain encountered on our Saddlesore 1000 ride. Although there is no rain hood, the adjustable collar sealed tight enough to keep the dreaded cold drip down the center of the back from occurring.

Spidi 4season h2out neck layers

While having to close three layers around the neck may seem a bit excessive, it keeps the cold and wet out, making it well worth the effort. The layers are: quilted (zipped by neck), H2Out (unsnapped at neck), and armored exterior (held in fingers).

The final layer of this modular suit – the layer that gives the suit its 4Season name – is the fiber-filled quilted liner. Essentially a lightweight insulated jacket that is worn under the other two layers, the innermost liner helps the rider maintain a warm core, which signals their body that it is safe to maintain a high level of blood flow to the extremities. Although the liner utilizes seven snapping loops to affix it to the jacket, I wore it as a separate jacket under the other two outer layers. This allowed me to easily remove the insulating layer as the temperature rose and fell. Unlike the H2Out liner, its exact positioning isn’t as absolutely important for rider comfort. Although the insulated layer functioned as a light jacket when sitting outside on a coolish day, the lack of exterior hand warmer pockets was a missed opportunity on this otherwise well thought out riding suit.

The Technology In Action

When I first received the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit, I was surprised that the pants didn’t feature an insulated liner like the jacket. I have worn this jacket in temperatures ranging from the mid-80s to the low 30s Fahrenheit and am impressed with the suit’s versatility. In cooler weather – down to the upper 40s – simply adding the insulated liner was enough to keep me comfortable, though I did notice a bit of chilliness creeping into my fingers once the temperature dropped to 50° F. Adding an Aerostich Kanetsu AIRVANTAGE Electric Vest ($247) electric vest kept me cozy down to just around freezing – plus (or is that minus) wind-chill. In warmer weather, the venting is quite good. The 4Season looks to become my go-to warm-weather suit in addition to my cold-weather choice.

spidi 4season h2out suit pant straps

Whereas many suits zip the jacket to the pants, the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit uses these straps to pull the jacket down over the pants, ensuring that it doesn’t ride up and allow cold drafts or rain to reach the rider’s core.

In the wet, I stayed dry and comfortable – which is the purpose of riding gear. However, I’m a bit surprised by the limited amount of waterproof storage space provided. Essentially, the one mesh pocket inside the H2Out liner is all you’ve got unless it’s cold enough to prompt you to wear the insulated liner, too. In the end, I kept my wallet in the inner pocket and placed my keychain (which had my truck remote on it) in a ziplock bag in an outer pocket. If you’re not wearing the insulated liner, you’ll probably want to put your phone in a baggie, too. The mesh pocket gets a bit crowded with a wallet and a phone.

Venting is overlooked in pants, but the vents on the rider’s thighs make a noticeable difference in comfort in warm weather.

Venting is overlooked in pants, but the vents on the rider’s thighs make a noticeable difference in comfort in warm weather.

The suit itself is all-day comfortable. In the more than 24 hours straight that I wore it during our Saddlesore 1000 ride, it felt great. All I wore under it was my Rev’It Oxygen Shirt And Pants and a t-shirt. The 4Season’s layers that kept me so warm and dry did come with a slight cost, though. Every time I put my jacket back on at a gas stop, I had three separate zippers to close on the front of the jacket to seal it – which seems like a small price to pay to be warm and dry.

MO Tested: Rev’It Oxygen Shirt And Pants

The Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit comes in sizes from M-3XL with color options from Black, Black/Grey, Black/Grey/Blue, Black/Grey/Red, and Black/Grey/Hi-Viz Yellow. While I normally wear a L or XL, depending on the gear, I followed the sizing chart and ended up with 2XL for my size and a perfect fit. So, be aware that sizing seems to run on the small side. I’d recommend trying one on before buying.

At $1,080, the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit’s pricing isn’t cheap, but with the technology and versatility in riding conditions allowed by the construction, this should come as no surprise. Since I believe the back protector should be included in the price of a suit in this cost range, adding it brings the effective cost of the suit to $1,190. For the rider who rides long and hard, this will be money well spent. Learn more about the 4Season H2Out Suit at the Spidi website.

Spidi 4seasons h2out pockets

The cargo pockets (bottom) offer plenty of storage but are not waterproof. The zippered pockets (top) are good for items like change, earplugs, and keys.

Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4season h2out suit gauntlet zipper vent Spidi 4season h2out suit vent flaps Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit

MO Tested: Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

MO Tested: Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review

March 31, 2017 Evans Brasfield 0

Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review

Touring suits have a difficult job description. Quite simply, they need to protect the rider from both the elements and potential mishaps in a wide variety of weather and riding conditions. If you think that’s a prescription for compromise, you’d be right. However, compromise is not necessarily a bad thing. The essence of a successful compromise is how carefully the sacrifices are made. In the case of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit,  the designers made smart choices in crafting this modular riding garment.

The most obvious choice made by Spidi was to divide the differing kinds of protection required from the 4Season Suit into different layers. The exterior layer features abrasion protection the CE-certified armor in the elbows, shoulders, knees, and hips. (Oddly, the back protector is a $110 accessory item that was out of stock, but thanks to the interchangeability of Spidi’s armor, I was able to borrow Tom Roderick’s from his Spidi Ventamax H2Out Jacket.) The next layer is the waterproof layer, followed by the innermost insulating layer.

MO Tested: Spidi Ventamax H2Out Jacket & Thunder H2Out Pants

Layered Functionality

First, let’s consider the handsome exterior of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit. My wife has seen over 20 years-worth of riding gear pass through our house, and I can count on one hand the number of suits that she’s actually made me stop and model for her. After I was done prancing around the kitchen for her, she said the 4Season was the best looking touring suit she’d ever seen me wear. High praise from a very opinionated woman. However, the exterior construction is more than just a pretty face.

Spidi 4season h2out suit gauntlet zipper vent

The sleeve alone shows the versatility of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit. The adjusters allow the rider to fine-tune the sleeve’s fit. The reversible gauntlet zipper opens a vent on the inner arm for cooling airflow.

The exterior of the suit is constructed of what Spidi calls tenax Nylon 6.6 of varying densities, with lower potential for abrasion sections receiving the lighter, more supple textile. Higher impact areas, like the elbows, shoulders, knees, and seat receive a heavier version of the fabric, sometimes in multiple layers. To account for differing body types and for the fact that removing the two inner jacket layers can slightly affect its fit, adjustments are used throughout. The rider’s torso gets a high and low adjustment belts on both the left and right side to allow for broad-chested (or broad-bellied) riders. The arms each receive a strap on the upper and lower arm to minimize wind flap or give a little extra room for airflow on hot days. The bottom edge of the jacket also utilizes an adjustable elastic cord to help keep cold wind and rain out – a very good thing when one considers that the jacket and pants do not zip together.

Thanks to the layers, the vents on the jacket and pants do not need to be waterproof. This is a place that many suits run afoul of either leaks or poor venting. The two chest vents unzip and roll down to create a 5-inch x 5.5-inch opening. The rear vent measures 8 x 9 inches while the pants’ thigh vents form an 11-inch long triangle that is 3 inches wide at its base. All of the vent covers snap out of the way in their open configuration.

Spidi 4season h2out suit vent flaps

The vent flap tucks cleanly out of the way and is secured with snaps to hold it open. The tightly sealing zippers (left) keep cold air from leaking into the jacket in cooler weather.

The waterproof layer of the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit is completely removable, giving the rider direct access to the airflow from the vents in dry weather. When the H2Out inner layer is installed the suit becomes completely wind/water-proof. This design has two drawbacks that the rider must accept. First, none of the pockets in the exterior shell are waterproof. So, don’t keep your wallet or cell phone in them during a downpour. Second, donning the waterproof layer requires that the suit be removed. Personally, if it means I’ll be dry and warm, I’m willing to stand on the side of the road in my boxers for a minute or two. Your level of modesty may dictate otherwise.

The second issue with inserting the inner layer is the numerous attachment points between the exterior and interior layers. Personally, I always took the time to snap the 7 jacket loops and the 13 snaps (plus 6 loops) on the pants because they kept the liner properly positioned. Your mileage may vary. Once in place, the suit defended my meaty core from the sometimes heavy rain encountered on our Saddlesore 1000 ride. Although there is no rain hood, the adjustable collar sealed tight enough to keep the dreaded cold drip down the center of the back from occurring.

Spidi 4season h2out neck layers

While having to close three layers around the neck may seem a bit excessive, it keeps the cold and wet out, making it well worth the effort. The layers are: quilted (zipped by neck), H2Out (unsnapped at neck), and armored exterior (held in fingers).

The final layer of this modular suit – the layer that gives the suit its 4Season name – is the fiber-filled quilted liner. Essentially a lightweight insulated jacket that is worn under the other two layers, the innermost liner helps the rider maintain a warm core, which signals their body that it is safe to maintain a high level of blood flow to the extremities. Although the liner utilizes seven snapping loops to affix it to the jacket, I wore it as a separate jacket under the other two outer layers. This allowed me to easily remove the insulating layer as the temperature rose and fell. Unlike the H2Out liner, its exact positioning isn’t as absolutely important for rider comfort. Although the insulated layer functioned as a light jacket when sitting outside on a coolish day, the lack of exterior hand warmer pockets was a missed opportunity on this otherwise well thought out riding suit.

The Technology In Action

When I first received the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit, I was surprised that the pants didn’t feature an insulated liner like the jacket. I have worn this jacket in temperatures ranging from the mid-80s to the low 30s Fahrenheit and am impressed with the suit’s versatility. In cooler weather – down to the upper 40s – simply adding the insulated liner was enough to keep me comfortable, though I did notice a bit of chilliness creeping into my fingers once the temperature dropped to 50° F. Adding an Aerostich Kanetsu AIRVANTAGE Electric Vest ($247) electric vest kept me cozy down to just around freezing – plus (or is that minus) wind-chill. In warmer weather, the venting is quite good. The 4Season looks to become my go-to warm-weather suit in addition to my cold-weather choice.

spidi 4season h2out suit pant straps

Whereas many suits zip the jacket to the pants, the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit uses these straps to pull the jacket down over the pants, ensuring that it doesn’t ride up and allow cold drafts or rain to reach the rider’s core.

In the wet, I stayed dry and comfortable – which is the purpose of riding gear. However, I’m a bit surprised by the limited amount of waterproof storage space provided. Essentially, the one mesh pocket inside the H2Out liner is all you’ve got unless it’s cold enough to prompt you to wear the insulated liner, too. In the end, I kept my wallet in the inner pocket and placed my keychain (which had my truck remote on it) in a ziplock bag in an outer pocket. If you’re not wearing the insulated liner, you’ll probably want to put your phone in a baggie, too. The mesh pocket gets a bit crowded with a wallet and a phone.

Venting is overlooked in pants, but the vents on the rider’s thighs make a noticeable difference in comfort in warm weather.

Venting is overlooked in pants, but the vents on the rider’s thighs make a noticeable difference in comfort in warm weather.

The suit itself is all-day comfortable. In the more than 24 hours straight that I wore it during our Saddlesore 1000 ride, it felt great. All I wore under it was my Rev’It Oxygen Shirt And Pants and a t-shirt. The 4Season’s layers that kept me so warm and dry did come with a slight cost, though. Every time I put my jacket back on at a gas stop, I had three separate zippers to close on the front of the jacket to seal it – which seems like a small price to pay to be warm and dry.

MO Tested: Rev’It Oxygen Shirt And Pants

The Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit comes in sizes from M-3XL with color options from Black, Black/Grey, Black/Grey/Blue, Black/Grey/Red, and Black/Grey/Hi-Viz Yellow. While I normally wear a L or XL, depending on the gear, I followed the sizing chart and ended up with 2XL for my size and a perfect fit. So, be aware that sizing seems to run on the small side. I’d recommend trying one on before buying.

At $1,080, the Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit’s pricing isn’t cheap, but with the technology and versatility in riding conditions allowed by the construction, this should come as no surprise. Since I believe the back protector should be included in the price of a suit in this cost range, adding it brings the effective cost of the suit to $1,190. For the rider who rides long and hard, this will be money well spent. Learn more about the 4Season H2Out Suit at the Spidi website.

Spidi 4seasons h2out pockets

The cargo pockets (bottom) offer plenty of storage but are not waterproof. The zippered pockets (top) are good for items like change, earplugs, and keys.

Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4season h2out suit gauntlet zipper vent Spidi 4season h2out suit vent flaps Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit

MO Tested: Spidi 4Season H2Out Suit Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

SpeedMob Now Carrying Arrow Exhausts For 2017 Kawasaki Z650

March 31, 2017 Press Release 0

Shave some weight and add a little more power to your Kawasaki Z650.

Begin Press Release:


Arrow Exhausts for Kawasaki’s New 2017 Z650

A fleet of Arrow Exhausts now available from SpeedMob

Hot on the heels of Arrows new GSX-R1000/R exhausts come a host of new exhaust options for Kawasaki’s hot new naked bike, the 2017 Kawasaki Z650.

Arrow Racing Collectors with Aluminum Dark Race-Tech Silencer with Carbon End Cap MSRP:$817.06

Arrow Racing Collectors with Aluminum Dark Race-Tech Silencer with Carbon End Cap MSRP:$817.06

SpeedMob has your track-day aspirations covered with Arrow’s new full system exhausts. The center of this design is the all-new Stainless Steel Racing Collector designed to work in conjunction with five different Arrow Silencer designs.

Within these designs there are also material design options on these silencers: Aluminum, Aluminum Dark, Aluminum White, Stainless Steel, Dark Stainless, Carbon Fiber and Titanium with optional Steel or Carbon Fiber end caps.

These combinations were developed in Arrows world–class R&D center to maximize the Z650’s torque curve and maximum horsepower, creating an amazing linear power curve for these bikes.

Arrow Racing Collectors with Titanium Pro Race silencer MSRP:$837.83

Arrow Racing Collectors with Titanium Pro Race silencer MSRP:$837.83

The Z650 exhausts are available now for ordering and the Z900 exhausts coming very soon!

With SpeedMob’s recent dramatic price reductions on all Arrow Exhausts, these systems are more affordable than they have ever been in the US Market. Contact SpeedMob now to find out more or to price out your favorite system.

29ec4406-b801-4087-bb04-572941eeda7b_kawasaki_z_650_17

For more information or to place an order, please contact SpeedMob directly at 510-232-4040, email info@speedmob.com or visit www.speedmob.com (new full functioning website will be launched soon!)

Speedmob is currently accepting race sponsorship applications for the 2017 season! Apply online or send your race resume to racing@speedmob.com.

SpeedMob Now Carrying Arrow Exhausts For 2017 Kawasaki Z650 appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.

Mugen Goes Prehistoric With The E-Rex Electric Dirt Bike

March 31, 2017 Troy Siahaan 0

Recently, at the 2017 Tokyo Motorcycle Show, Mugen unveiled the latest version of its Isle of Man TT-Zero racer, the Shinden Roku, the bike that’s heavily favored to take the top two spots on the podium this year with riders John McGuinness and Guy Martin. The Shinden Roku is an impressive bike in its own right, with claims of 160.9 hp and 154.9 lb-ft of torque, and a weight savings of more than four pounds compared to last year. However, as impressive as the Shinden Roku is, as far as sheer “Wow Factor” goes it’s got nothing on the other bike Mugen unveiled: The E-Rex electric motocrosser.

mugen-e-rex-rear-1

Using the frame and swingarm from Honda’s CRF250R, the E-Rex shocks the senses with its outlandish styling inspired by, as the name would suggest, dinosaurs. The front fender and number plate are one unit designed to look like something resembling a pterodactyl beak, with the signature Mugen eye balls giving a face to the number plate. But the real head turner is the rest of the bodywork, which is shaped and colored to look like a prehistoric pterodactyl skeleton, with its ribbed slats exposing the airy void beneath the seat.

As for the rest of the bike, the internal combustion engine and its associated components were pulled in order to fit the electric drivetrain. No details about the battery or motor were released, but looking closely at the photos the battery and motor are stacked vertically in the red enclosure (zoom in on the picture and you can see where they join together). The motor’s liquid-cooled, too, as a radiator on the left side of the bike is clear to see, and its hoses lead directly to the motor. There’s a fan on the right side of the motor, which would surely get clogged up during a moto, so the actual functionality of the bike is questionable. Nonetheless, it still sports Excel rims, Dunlop Geomax rubber, Showa suspension, and brake levers at each handlebar.

mugen-e-rex-1

The E-Rex is clearly a design exercise, so don’t expect to see something like it at your local MX track soon, but in its press release it was stated that Mugen and Honda will “explore the future potential… for electric motocross machines.” So while we won’t be seeing the E-Rex at dealers, might a CRF250-E be coming instead? Stay tuned.

Mugen Goes Prehistoric With The E-Rex Electric Dirt Bike appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

2017 Honda Rebel 500 Review: First Ride

March 31, 2017 admin 0

2017 Honda Rebel 500

Editor Score: 82.5%
Engine 17.5/20
Suspension/Handling 10.5/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 8.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 9.0/10
Appearance/Quality 8.5/10
Desirability 7.5/10
Value 8.5/10
Overall Score82.5/100

I’m not sure if it’s my naturally rebellious nature, being a man who microwaves his food still in the tupperware and even known to occasionally fill water cups up with soda (that’s right, bitch), that got me the chance to head up to Venice Beach, California, for the launch of the new Honda Rebel 500, but I think it might be because the rest of the Motorcycle.com staff (except Troy) is in the tin-foil reusing, cabbage-scented stage of life.

The Rebel was first introduced in 1985 as a way for Honda to target a younger generation, typically new to motorcycles, and broke. Which is especially true today where a coffee and bagel costs an hour of labor, and the idea of owning a home almost anywhere in California is a long-off and mystical dreamscape. With strange quinoa and farro dietary options on every corner, Los Angeles is the ground-zero dwelling of the hip Instagram demographic that Honda hopes to see straddling its extremely user friendly, affordable, and bare-bones styled new Rebel, which starts at a very reasonable $5,999 for the base model, and $6,299 for ABS.

2017 Honda Rebel 500 ergonomics

I’m just about 6 feet, with 31 inch legs, and the Rebel fits me just about right.

I think the bike looks awesome. I am a huge fan of the minimalist, exposed, and simple styling of the Rebel. The classic large round LED headlight at the front, black trellis frame, and angled teardrop tank all are simple and work well together. You can get the 500 in Tennis Ball Yellow, Matte Silver, Red, and Black; the ABS model is strangely available only in Black. And even though the Rebel comes in a smaller displacement (more on the Rebel 300 next week), it has the styling of bigger cruisers. The Rebel’s lead engineer, Keita Mikura pointed out it shares its fat front 130/90-16 tire and 150/80-16 rear with bikes like the Indian Scout.

The stripped-down styling leaves a lot of room for customization, something that Honda really wants to encourage with the Rebel. The steel rear fender is purposefully designed to be completely removable via a couple bolts, giving the bike a full-on bobber look. I personally would rip that rear fender off and throw some clip-ons on ol’ bessy like the custom P-40-styled Rebel 500 seen below, but that’s just me.

2017 Honda Rebel 500 P-40 Warhawk custom

This P-40 Warhawk-inspired custom 500 built by Honda is an example of the customization it hopes to see owners experimenting with.

The Rebel has gotten a huge performance upgrade in addition to its makeover. Instead of that weezy old air-cooled carbureted 250cc Twin (or the old 450 Twin), the Rebel 500 gets its ponies straight from the CBR500R/CB500F/CB500X 471cc fuel-injected liquid-cooled parallel-Twin with four valves-per-cylinder, which has been tuned for the Rebel to deliver better bottom-end power than its sportier cousins. There is plenty of fun to be had on the Rebel 500; while it’s not going to win many drag races, it is a perfectly capable, tried and true powerplant that you can still rip around on with ease and cheapness, since it’ll go 60 miles on a gallon of gas – a thing you will appreciate considering its rather small 2.96 gallon fuel tank.

2017 Honda Rebel 500 instruments, speedometer, clock,fuel tank

Simple Honda instrument panel and controls. A speedometer, clock and fuel gauge is pretty much all you get.

The transmission is plenty smooth with no need to fight through gears, and the clutch is nice and light. At highway speeds, however, you’ll find a buzz throughout the bike at around 65 mph. It’s not going to rattle your fingers numb or coax a bowel movement out of you, but it is noticeable and mellows out above or below that range in sixth gear. But the comfort and handling of the Rebel is what allows its motor to shine.

The riding position is natural and perfect for this style bike. I am very happy Honda didn’t go with the the outstretched cruiser pegs that tend to make me feel like I am hanging on for life by the bars at high speeds. The pegs are in a natural position, and the seat is a bit firm but comfortable. The bars have been positioned in a solid location that has the arms out straight with a slight elbow bend. Altogether the Rebel has an approachable and comfortable stature with a nice and low 27.2-inch seat height.

Me racing to get some new beard oil.

Me racing to get some new beard oil.

The Rebel is also nimble, and with its raised footpegs, cornering isn’t something that will make you pucker your keester, well, depending on the situation. Navigating at slows speeds is easy and natural, and at higher speeds you’ll find it… semi-confident and sturdy. It really hits the sweet spot of maneuverability in situations such as parking lots and heavy L.A. traffic. But cornering confidence is dented once you realize how squishy the suspension is. One of the first things I noticed is how much the 41mm fork compressed with a simple push on the front end with the bike stationary and the front brake locked. The softness is nice in certain instances, providing a cushy ride, but it takes on a floaty-ness underneath you if you hit a series of bumps while hauling ass. This softness works against the performance promises offered by decent cornering clearance from the relatively high footpegs. If you’re ripping around on the Rebel, you’ll find that 4.8 inches of front travel disappears quickly; its rear 3.8 inches of travel on its dual shocks was better controlled.

The Honda Rebel also received an upgrade in the brakes department from the previous Rebel’s rear drum and lonely front disc. You’ll now find disc brakes at the front and rear, which provide plenty of stopping power for the 408-pound cruiser. You can brake hard with confidence on the fat front tire and not worry about pinching your fingers off with the brake lever like I did on the 2015 Harley-Davidson Street 750 that I had tested when it was first released. Everything on this bike feels a bit “affordable” but it is Honda affordable, which means “pretty good.”

2017 Honda Rebel 500 parked sunset

The 2017 Rebel carries on the torch for newer riders and looks great doing it.

Considering the intended riding style for this bike and its reasonable price, great styling, quality parts and materials, the Rebel 500 is solid choice for beginning or intermediate riders when it hits the showroom floor in April.

Me racing to get some new beard oil. 2017 Honda Rebel 500 parked sunset Simple Honda instrument panel and controls. A speedometer, clock and fuel gauge is pretty much all you get. This P-40 Warhawk-inspired custom 500 built by Honda is an example of the customization it hopes to see owners experimenting with. 033117-2017-honda-rebel-500-1 I’m just about 6 feet, with 31 inch legs, and the Rebel fits me just about right.

2017 Honda Rebel 500 Review: First Ride appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Top 10 Facts About Michelin MotoGP Tires

March 31, 2017 Evans Brasfield 0

Michelin MotoGP Tires

This past weekend at the MotoGP race at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar, I had the opportunity to tour the Michelin paddock area to learn some fascinating information about what happens to the Michelin MotoGP Tires on every race weekend.

In 2016 Michelin took over as the official MotoGP tire supplier after seven seasons of Bridgestone performing that function. The season was a huge learning curve for both Michelin and the riders. Michelin had to come to grips with how far the motorcycles had advanced in the seven years since it last made tires for GP’s premier class, while riders and teams had to grapple with the best way to set up their machinery to get the most out of the Michelin rubber. This adaptation by the riders and their mechanics is best emphasized by the spate of front-end crashes at the start of the season that largely faded by the end of 2016 as Michelin, the riders, and the mechanics worked together to achieve their mutual goal. In MotoGP, the tire manufacturer has to be almost perfect because the safety of the riders depends on it.

Top 10 Facts About Michelin MotoGP Tires appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Poll: KTM 1090 Adventure R or Honda Africa Twin

March 31, 2017 Troy Siahaan 0

When it comes to the Adventure scene, there’s a strong case to be made that nobody does it better than KTM. Take the 1090 Adventure R for example. Tom Roderick just came back from its launch, and in his First Ride Review, he gushes about how easy the bike is to ride both on- and off-road, thanks to its reduced weight compared to the previous 1190 Adventure, and despite carrying a powerful 1050cc V-Twin between its trellis frame, the KTM is able to dole out manageable off-road power thanks to its dirt riding mode.

Then again, Tom also came back from the Honda Africa Twin launch pretty impressed with its on- and off-road abilities, too. Granted, it was the DCT version that really enamored him, but the standard transmission version is a more than capable machine to tackle nearly any terrain.

Tom posed this question in his KTM review, so of course we asked ourselves: Which of these two is the better bike? The KTM or Honda (standard transmission in this case)? On paper, the 1090 Adventure R would appear to have the advantage: Bigger engine (1050cc vs. 998cc), more power, Brembo brakes, larger fuel tank (6.5 gallons vs. 4.96 gallons) and that unmistakable KTM off-road prowess.

But the Africa Twin costs significantly less ($13,299 for the standard transmission vs. $14,699), has more suspension travel (9.1-inch front/8.7-inch rear vs. 8.6 inches front and rear), lower seat height, and of course the optional DCT. Both have riding modes, ABS, and traction control.

Debating on specs will only get you so far. While there’s no doubt the KTM is a good motorcycle, the Africa Twin can likely traverse equally gnarly terrain. We can’t wait to ride them both back-to-back to decide a winner once and for all, but until then we leave you with this question:

Poll: KTM 1090 Adventure R or Honda Africa Twin appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R Review – First Ride

March 31, 2017 Tom Roderick 0

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R

Editor Score: 91.25%
Engine 18.75/20
Suspension/Handling 14.5/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 9.0/10
Instruments/Controls4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 8.5/10
Appearance/Quality 9.5/10
Desirability 9.0/10
Value 9.0/10
Overall Score91.25/100

It’s not often a reduction in engine displacement results in a superior motorcycle (bigger is better, right?), but that’s the case with KTM’s new 1090 Adventure R. Gone are the 1190 Adventure and Adventure R models and in their stead a new 1050cc R model that’s smaller in both bore and stroke (103mm/63mm vs. 105mm/69mm) equaling a 145cc reduction in displacement. Whatever the 1090 gives up in power production to the 1190 Adventure R it makes up for in lighter weight and better handling.

Using KTM’s claim that the 1090 is 22 pounds lighter than the 1190 (456 pounds dry vs. 478 pounds dry), and the company’s claimed peak power production for each model (125 hp for the 1090 vs. 150 hp for the 1190), simple math reveals the 1090 is moving more weight per horsepower (3.65 pounds/hp) than the 1190 (3.18 pounds/hp). But that’s peak power in Sport riding mode. In the more important Off-Road setting where both bikes are limited to 100 horsepower, the 1090 has an advantage of moving 4.56 pounds/hp, where the 1190 was pushing 4.78 pounds/hp. Torque is a slightly different story with the 1090 giving up 12 lb.-ft. to the 1190 – 80 lb.-ft. at 6500 rpm vs. 92 lb.-ft. at 8000 rpm.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R engine, trellis frame, crash bars and skidplate.

The 1090’s weight advantage over the 1190 is largely found in the engine: shorter cylinders and connecting rods, smaller pistons, lighter counterbalancer, etc. The 1190’s centerstand and C-ABS were removed, which further reduced weight. The crashbars are stock items; the skidplate and rally footpegs are not.

How noticeable is it? On pavement, the 1090 R accelerates with enough gusto to keep your average sportbike guy happy, but it’s not the same missile the 1190 was. In the dirt, in Off-Road mode, the 1090 makes more power than can be used in most situations, and this is where the 22-pound diet becomes more important than power production.

2016 Adventure Bikes Spec For Spec

Most of the lost weight is credited to the smaller-displacement engine – so not only is it less weight but also a reduced amount of reciprocating mass. Combined with the removal of the 1190’s centerstand, the weight was subtracted from low in the bike’s chassis, providing a more maneuverable motorcycle than 22 pounds indicates.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R riding through mud

It ain’t an off-road party until someone gets muddy! Cornering ABS is gone but On- and Off-Road ABS, MTC, ride-by-wire throttle and the slipper clutch remain. There’s also a manually adjustable windscreen and brushguards that are part of the stock configuration.

Regardless of Riding Mode, power production is smooth and linear, and the fueling perfect. On the technical off-road sections we rode, the 75-degree LC8 V-Twin was happy to let the pistons spin down to damn-near stalling, then pick up revs without feathering the clutch. Kind of a Jeep of motorcycle engines except for its proclivity to accelerate quicker than any Jeep ever.

2013 KTM 1190 Adventure R Review

A lot of the Adventure R’s rideability comes from its excellent electronics package. Not only does the Off-Road setting reduce peak power, it also softens the way in which the power is delivered. Switching from Sport to Off-Road while in the dirt makes differences in power delivery between the riding modes readily apparent. Switching ride modes also alters traction control and ABS settings; Off-Road allowing for some rear-wheel spin before TC activates, and it also turns ABS off on the rear wheel, while a rider still enjoys the comfort of ABS on the front wheel. I’d like to think it was my skill that prevented a few front-end washouts, but I’m certain it was ABS that saved my bacon more than once when braking on a slippery downhill section of our ride.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R instruments

The 1090 R’s instrument cluster is the same as the 1190’s. Nothing fancy like the new 1290 Super Adventure’s full-color clocks, but the analog tach is familiar while the digitals readouts are legible and easy to navigate.

Our test bikes were outfitted with the off-road dongle ($109), a plug-and-play electronic device that allows your settings to remain in place when keying off the ignition. Without it the ECU will default to its stock settings, meaning if you had TC and ABS switched off, they will be switched on the next time you start the bike. The dongle also overrides the ECU’s stock setting of shutting down the engine if bad gas is detected. For those who travel to truly exotic and remote locations, this could be a lifesaver.

AltRider Taste Of Dakar Adventure Ride

The other upgrade of the 1090 over the 1190 is its suspension. The front is outfitted with a revised 48mm fully adjustable WP USD fork with separate compression and rebound functions, while the fully adjustable rear WP shock features a new Progressive Damping System. The 220mm of travel, front and rear, is the same as the 1190, but the revised settings keep the units riding higher in their respective strokes, making for a more compliant ride with less bottoming both off and on the road.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure on paved road

The new suspension settings help the Adventure R’s on-road handling as much as they do when off-road, with less front-end dive under hard braking. Continental TKC 80 tires provide good off-road grip while performing more than adequately at street speeds.

At 35 inches, the Adventure R’s seat height certainly isn’t short, but the seat-to-footpeg ratio started feeling a little tight after two days of riding, or maybe it’s just the aging of my joints. The footpegs do offer two-position adjustability, but I didn’t get a chance to sample difference this time around. Otherwise, the seating position is good for all-day riding, with taller riders maybe wanting to increase the height of the handlebar riser to help decrease the amount of lean the stock bars demand when standing.

From here the 1090 and 1190 are largely similar bikes, sharing most of the same components and figures on their respective spec sheets. Which makes it even more amazing how much more nimble the 1090 can feel over the 1190 with only weight, engine and suspension upgrades. The 1090 enjoys the advantages of a new front brake master cylinder, but otherwise it’s same brakes as were on the 1190.

033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-dirt

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R
+ Highs

  • A lighter, better Adventure R
  • Reduced MSRP
  • Upgraded suspension
– Sighs

  • Tall riders might appreciate more legroom
  • More handlebar rise needed for taller folk
  • We feel compelled to complain about less power, even though it doesn’t adversely affect the bike

In last year’s 2016 Wire-Wheel Adventure Shootout, the Honda Africa Twin bested the 1190 Adventure R in objective scoring but was defeated by the KTM in subjective scoring. I think it’d be a very interesting shootout between the Africa Twin with DCT and the new KTM 1090 Adventure R. The two are close in price ($13,999 Honda vs $14,699 KTM), performance, and weight, but each with some advantage over the other.

If you’d like to see these two go head-to-head or have a suggestion for another or additional bike that should be included, let us know in the comments section below.

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R Specifications
MSRP $14,699
Horsepower 125 hp @ 8500 rpm (claimed)
Torque 80 lb.-ft. @ 6500 rpm (claimed)
Engine Capacity 1050cc
Engine Type 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, V 75°
Bore x Stroke 103mm/63mm
Compression 13.0:1
Fuel System Keihin EFI (throttle body 52mm)
Transmission 6-speed
Clutch PASC slipper clutch, hydraulically operated
Final Drive Chain
Frame Chromium-molybdenum trellis frame, powder coated
Front Suspension WP-USD 48mm, 220mm of travel
Rear Suspension WP shock absorber, 220mm of travel
Front Brakes 2 x Brembo 4-piston, radially mounted caliper, brake disc 320mm
Rear Brakes Brembo two-piston fixed caliper, brake disc 267mm
Front Tire 90/90-21
Rear Tire 150/70-18
Seat Height 35 in.
Wheelbase 62.2 in.
Rake/Trail 26°/123mm
Dry Weight (claimed) 472 pounds
Fuel Capacity 6.4 gal.
Electronics Ride modes, TC, ABS
033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-boot9963-dirt-road 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-boot9886-dirt-road 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-boot9985-dirt-road 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-dirt 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-back 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-front 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-left 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-left-front 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-left-rear 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-right 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-right-front 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-right-rear 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-top 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-dirt 2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R engine and trellis frame 2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R instruments 2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R riding through mud 2017 KTM 1090 Adventure on paved road 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-forest 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2501 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2515 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2516 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2517 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2522-headlight 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2607-front-wheel 033017-2017-ktm-1090-adventure-r-2a0a2614-group

2017 KTM 1090 Adventure R Review – First Ride appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

YART Yamaha Tops EWC Test At Le Mans

March 30, 2017 Press Release 0

The prestigious Le Mans 24-hour race isn’t just for cars…

Begin Press Release:


YART Yamaha Official EWC Team Completes Le Mans Test On Top

During the two-day test for the 2017 Le Mans 24 Heures Motos this week the YART Yamaha Official EWC Team dominated the time sheets with their four official riders on track.
The focus of the Austrian team was to get to grips with the resurfaced Bugatti circuit as well as the development of the partnership with Bridgestone – the official tyre supplier in 2017.

Aboard their YZF-R1 machine with Bridgestone tyres the riders Broc Parkes, Kohta Nozane, Marvin Fritz and Max Neukirchner put in several racing simulations as well as shorter stints to focus on outright performance.
The dry conditions during the test helped the team set the overall fastest time on the second day of 1’36.866. A clear indication that the efforts of the team and its partners are working towards even faster times during the qualifying sessions.

GMT94 Yamaha Official EWC Team with Mike Di Meglio, Niccolò Canepa and David Checa enjoyed a positive test overall. The double World Championship winning squad have been further developing the YZF-R1 from the Bol d’Or in 2016 and have worked on the overall performance and endurance.
With the focus on race simulation and the challenging conditions the Le Mans 24HR faces, the team tested the various new parts and Dunlop tyres brought to the test.

Testing from 9am onwards proved to be the ideal setting to test the various track temperatures and find the right compounds for the race. With all riders putting in various race simulation stints both teams managed to complete a significant amount of laps in total.
The 24 Hours Motos race will start on Saturday 15th of April at 15:00 CET with on-track activities getting underway from Thursday April 13th onwards.

Max Neukircher

YART Yamaha Official EWC Team

“For us it was the perfect test. We managed to put in a lot of laps, possibly the most of all teams attending. The times we managed to set where fast but Broc was amazing. Considering that it was the first time on track for both Marvin and Kohta, they where only a few tenths slower and fast from the start. We also found a very good suspension setting. In combination with the great support from Bridgestone and YEC, we tested a wide variety of compounds and found the best tyre for the race. Not only for the warmer conditions but also in the cold. The team as a whole is really great. We all have the same goals and ambitions, it feels like a proper family!

Mandy Kainz

YART Yamaha Official EWC Team Manager

We are very happy with the results of the tests. All four riders have the speed and the consistency. Kohta Nozane and Marvin Fritz are getting to grips with the track lay-out and are doing well but this is a team effort and all riders are contributing to the result these two days. We did not take any risks overall but still the lap-times where incredibly fast, very close to the lap record set by Sheridan Morais last year on our YZF-R1. The support of Bridgestone and the Yamaha engineers is clearly paying off and we are very confident for the 24 Hour Le Mans race.”

Christophe Guyot

GMT94 Yamaha Official EWC Team Manager

Overall it was a positive test for us. We have done a lot of work on the bike compared to last year and made a clear step forward. With the resurfaced track our main goal was not to focus on lap times but overall race and tyre performance. The suspension package we have from Ôhlins is really good, the same for the electronics, although we made some improvements there as well. The riders are very easy to work with. Mike Di Meglio is a very good addition to the team. Niccolò Canepa and David Checa are very strong and solid riders. We have a lot of pleasure and are very motivated. A dream team!”

2s3plgpcqtwuew2di5mx 9copqvtdy7vh8qdwex04 akh2e871rokl96sofe6h d5yk9ii9a2bow5bk0x1d ki4rhf0jbdpq578fp6sa tfr01nyknrr54ggfm6em tvwbjt3yovyftmltk7vg wh1m6a02w6b97xgcntkw y3pqpwxzwzaaehqhshxr

YART Yamaha Tops EWC Test At Le Mans appeared first on Motorcycle.com News.